Translate

There was an error in this gadget
power by WikipediaMindmap
There was an error in this gadget

Saturday, November 29, 2014

Psychotherapy Blog: Depression: Overcoming Guilt and Shame About Feeling Depressed - Part 2

In my prior article,  Overcoming Guilt and Shame About Feeling Depressed - Part 1,  I began this discussion by defining major depression, the most common depression that people experience.

Depression:  Overcoming Guilt and Shame About Feeling Depressed

In this article, I'm focusing on how guilt and shame about feeling depressed is often based on misconceptions about depression and how these misconceptions can get in the way of your recovering from depression.  Some of these misconceptions are popular in our Western culture.

Let's start by looking at some of the misconceptions about depression.

Misconceptions About Depression:
  • If people really want to overcome depression, all they need to do is "snap out of it" to feel better.
  • If people are depressed, they don't want to feel better.
  • If people who are depressed just "stayed busy," they'd stop feeling depressed.
  • People who are depressed aren't trying hard enough to get better.
  • People who are depressed have "no reason" to be depressed.
  • Other people, who have it worse, aren't depressed.
  • People who are depressed have only themselves to blame for their depression.
  • People who are depressed are "lazy."
  • People who are depressed are "failures."
  • People who say they're depressed are just trying to get attention.
  • People who are depressed are self centered.
  • There's no such thing as depression.  There are only people who say they're depressed and who are faking it.
  • You're life is good--what do you have to be depressed about?
I'm sure you could come up with many other misconceptions about depression and people who are depressed.

The point is that these misconceptions, whether they're coming from the person who is depressed or people around him or her, serve to exacerbate the depression and often cause the person who is depressed to feel guilty and shamed.

Depression:  Overcoming Guilt and Shame About Feeling Depressed

If you're feeling depressed, blaming yourself will only make you feel worse.

Becoming aware that these ideas are misconceptions is the first step in overcoming guilt and shame about feeling depressed.

If your loved ones are the ones who are talking to you about your depression by trying to convince you about one or more of these common misconceptions, you need to take care of yourself and stop giving credence to these ideas.

Overcoming Guilt and Shame About Feeling Depressed

If you're the one who is engaging in negative self talk about your depression, be aware that you're doing the equivalent of kicking yourself while you're down.

You need to recognize these thoughts for the distorted thoughts that they are and get professional help from a licensed mental health professional.

In my next article, Part 3, I'll continue this discussion.

Getting Help in Therapy
In the meantime, if you or someone you love is suffering with depression, it's important to take it seriously and seek help from a licensed mental health professional as soon as possible.

Getting Help in Therapy


About Me
I am a licensed NYC psychotherapist, hypnotherapist, EMDR and Somatic Experiencing therapist who works with individual adults and couples.

To find out more about me, visit my website:  Josephine Ferraro, LCSW - NYC Psychotherapist.

To set up a consultation, call me at (212) 726-1006 or email me.

Also see:  Depression: Overcoming Guilt and Shame About Feeling Depressed - Part 3
























No comments: